Archives - Two-step verification


Set up two-step authentication on your Apple ID or Google Account

You probably have at least one device that runs either iOS or Android. In order to protect your data and identity, set up two-factor authentication so that every login attempt requires an additional credential on top of your username and password. This might be a text message code or an approval from another trusted device.

How do I enable Multi-Factor Authentication?

Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) is a form of additional security that you can add to accounts to protect yourself against hackers and unwanted logins from third parties. Also known as Two-Factor Authorization (TFA) or Two-Step Verification (2SV), this strategy has been adopted by many of the best and most popular tech companies to provide users with […]

Use MFA

Multi Factor Authentication (MFA) — also known as Two Factor Authentication (2FA) or verification — provides an additional layer of protection for accounts that require a login. How it usually works is that when you attempt to log into an account online, you’ll receive a prompt on your synced device to confirm the login attempt. […]

Use multi-factor authentication to protect your accounts

Even some video games recently offering rewards to users who set up two-factor authentication on their accounts. Best practice is to use this extra layer of protection on any service that provides it. This way, you’ll be safe even if someone gains access to your password and username.

Use two-factor authentication on important accounts

Complicated passwords provide exceptional protection against hacking – but what if somebody intercepted them? Reduce the risk of password theft, set up two-factor authentication on sensitive accounts. This requires anyone requesting access to supply an extra credential, such as a code sent to a separate device, in order to log in.

Enable two-step verification (2SV) on your Amazon account

2SV adds an extra layer of security to your accounts, which is imperative for accounts that contain your credit card information, like Amazon. If you set your Amazon account up with 2SV (two-step verification) a hacker will need more than just your username and password to use your account. A code will be sent to […]